working parents

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The Center for American Progress report "Workin' 9 to 5: How School Schedules Make Life Harder for Working Parents" looks at "the unrealistic expectations that schools too often have for working parents and the ways in which school policies put pressure on already stretched families:"

By closing at 3:00 p.m., shutting down intermittently and frequently, hosting important school events in the middle of the day, and more, schools make it really hard for parents to balance their commitments to their children and their jobs.

[...] In fact, nearly half of all workers report not having any form of flexibility in their work schedules. Almost 40 percent of all workers do not even have paid vacation

The report enumerates and examines "the multitude of ways that U.S. public schools make life unnecessarily harder for working parents:"

Throughout the school year, schools are closed for 29 days, more than two workweeks longer than the average private-sector worker has in paid vacation and holidays.
As a consequence, even if full-time workers devoted all of their paid vacation time and holidays to cover school closings, they would still need to find an alternative way to care for their children on at least 13 days throughout the school year.

If families pay out of pocket for child care to cover the excess school closure days and hours, it would cost an average of $6,600 per year, or 9 percent of an average family's income. [...]

Misaligned school schedules cost the U.S. economy $55 billion in lost productivity annually.

What to do?

CAP recommends policy changes at the federal, state, and local levels to align school and work schedules. These policy solutions should extend the length of the school day, reduce the number of school closures, reform the calendar year, and rethink engagement strategies.

The idea of "a 9-to-5 school day" deserves serious consideration.

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This page contains a single entry by cognitivedissident published on October 11, 2016 9:40 AM.

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