Snowden and CitizenFour

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National Journal reports that Edward Snowden disagreed with journalist Jane Mayer's assertion that NSA spying programs are legal:

Snowden disagreed, saying he "would dispute that no crimes have been shown." He pointed to government officials who appear to have lied to Congress under oath, and said the programs have been routinely abused by employees.

"We have had serial abuse from NSA agents spying on exes, lovers ... never prosecuted. That's a felony," he said. [...] "These programs themselves are unconstitutional [and] I am confident that the Supreme Court will agree these programs went too far."

Snowden cited a ruling by a federal judge last year that found the National Security Agency's bulk collection of American phone records likely unconstitutional as one reason for his confidence. He also noted that two presidential advisory panels have raised concerns about the lack of judicial oversight of the agency's programs.

Glenn Greenwald discussed a Snowden documentary called https://citizenfourfilm.com/ CitizenFour:

CITIZENFOUR, the new film by Intercept co-founding editor Laura Poitras, premiered this evening at the New York Film Festival, and will be in theaters around the country beginning October 24. Using all first-hand, real-time footage, it chronicles the extraordinary odyssey of Edward Snowden in Hong Kong while he worked with journalists, as well the aftermath of the disclosures for the NSA whistleblower himself and for countries and governments around the world.

Greenwald also mentions this "seemingly banal" detail:

In July of this year, Snowden's long-time girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, moved to Moscow to live with him...the fact that he is now living in domestic bliss as well, with his long-term girlfriend whom he loves, should forever put to rest the absurd campaign to depict his life as grim and dank.

Here's The Nation's sneak peek at an exclusive interview with Snowden. Katrina vanden Heuvel and Stephen Cohen write that "We recently met with the courageous whistleblower for over three hours in Moscow for a wide-ranging conversation on surveillance, technology and politics...a longer edited version will be published in a forthcoming issue." The highlight was this comment about patriotism:

Edward Snowden: You know, people sometimes say I broke an "oath of secrecy," that was one of the early charges leveled against me. But it's a fundamental misunderstanding, because there is no oath of secrecy for people who work in the intelligence community. You're asked to sign a civil agreement, called "Standard Form 312," which basically says, if you disclose classified information they can sue you, they can do this, that and the other. And you stand at risk of going to jail. But you are also asked to take an oath, and that's the oath of service. The oath of service is not to secrecy; it's to the Constitution--to protect it against all enemies, foreign and domestic. That's the oath that I kept, that James Clapper and Keith Alexander did not.

Here's the trailer for CitizenFour, which will be released on 24 October:

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This page contains a single entry by cognitivedissident published on October 11, 2014 5:44 PM.

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